<<O>>  Difference Topic LegalEntityEIN (r1.3 - 21 Aug 2007 - BenScott)

META TOPICPARENT LegalEntity
An EIN (Employer Identification Number) identifies an organization to the Federal government -- in particular, the IRS. It is used for way more than just employers. An EIN is a Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN), as is an SSN (Social Security Number). You need an EIN before you can do most anything with the IRS. You get an EIN first, then start applying for tax-exempt status or whatever.
Line: 15 to 15

Changed:
<
<
Application submitted 7 Aug 2007, circa 9 PM (EDT). Provisional EIN assigned as 26-0670370. See PDF at LegalEntityDocuments.
>
>
Application submitted 7 Aug 2007, circa 9 PM (EDT). Confirmation received 17 Aug 2007. EIN is 26-0670370. See LegalEntityDocuments.

 <<O>>  Difference Topic LegalEntityEIN (r1.2 - 07 Aug 2007 - BenScott)

META TOPICPARENT LegalEntity
An EIN (Employer Identification Number) identifies an organization to the Federal government -- in particular, the IRS. It is used for way more than just employers. An EIN is a Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN), as is an SSN (Social Security Number). You need an EIN before you can do most anything with the IRS. You get an EIN first, then start applying for tax-exempt status or whatever.
Line: 7 to 7

  • EIN is not a "tax-exempt number"
  • Tax-exempt numbers are usually assigned by state agencies
Deleted:
<
<
Application is required to be submitted by principle officer, with SSN, and such. I think that means Ted, not me.

Application process links:
Line: 17 to 15

Added:
>
>
Application submitted 7 Aug 2007, circa 9 PM (EDT). Provisional EIN assigned as 26-0670370. See PDF at LegalEntityDocuments.
 <<O>>  Difference Topic LegalEntityEIN (r1.1 - 07 Aug 2007 - BenScott)
Line: 1 to 1
Added:
>
>
META TOPICPARENT LegalEntity
An EIN (Employer Identification Number) identifies an organization to the Federal government -- in particular, the IRS. It is used for way more than just employers. An EIN is a Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN), as is an SSN (Social Security Number). You need an EIN before you can do most anything with the IRS. You get an EIN first, then start applying for tax-exempt status or whatever.

This EIN page states:

  • "Every organization must have an employer identification number, even if it will not have employees"
  • EIN is not a "tax-exempt number"
  • Tax-exempt numbers are usually assigned by state agencies

Application is required to be submitted by principle officer, with SSN, and such. I think that means Ted, not me.

Application process links:

View topic | Diffs | r1.3 | > | r1.2 | > | r1.1 | More
Revision r1.1 - 07 Aug 2007 - 20:26 - BenScott
Revision r1.3 - 21 Aug 2007 - 22:50 - BenScott